seem

seem
seem, look, appear can mean to be as stated in one's view or judgment, but not necessarily in fact Often they are used interchangeably with apparently no difference in meaning
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he seems tired

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the students look eager

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the orchestra appeared ready to begin

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But even in such phrases seem suggests an opinion based on subjective impressions and personal reaction rather than on objective signs
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a tiny pebble in the middle of your back seems to grow all night, and by the crack of dawn has grown to boulder size— Boy Scout Handbook

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my other visits to Greece were over twenty years ago. How would it seem after such a long time, and seen in such a different way— Chubb

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while look implies that the opinion is based on a general visual impression
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her . . . lips looked parched and unnatural— Glasgow

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Appear may convey the same implication as look but it sometimes suggests a distorted impression such as can be produced by an optical illusion, a restricted point of view, or another's dissembling
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his tongue . . . could make the worse appear the better reason— Milton

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the attempt has been made to make it appear that this conflict is not between religion and science, but between the latter and theology. This seems to me a cheap and worthless evasion— Cohen

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Analogous words: *infer, gather, judge, deduce, conclude

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

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  • seem — W1S1 [si:m] v [linking verb, not in progressive] [Date: 1100 1200; : Old Norse; Origin: sœma to be appropriate to , from sœmr appropriate ] 1.) to appear to exist or be true, or to have a particular quality ▪ Ann didn t seem very sure. ▪ It seems …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • seem — [ sim ] verb intransitive never progressive *** 1. ) to appear to be something or appear to have a particular quality: John seems nice. seem (to be) someone/something: Susan seems a very sensible person. seem happy/genuine/relaxed etc. to someone …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • seem´er — seem «seem», intransitive verb. 1. to look like; appear to be: »This apple seemed good but was rotten inside. Does this room seem hot to you? He seemed a very old man. He seemed very strong for his age. 2. to appear to oneself: »I still seem to… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Seem — (s[=e]m), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Seemed} (s[=e]md); p. pr. & vb. n. {Seeming}.] [OE. semen to seem, to become, befit, AS. s[=e]man to satisfy, pacify; akin to Icel. s[ae]ma to honor, to bear with, conform to, s[ae]mr becoming, fit, s[=o]ma to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • seem — /seem/, v.i. 1. to appear to be, feel, do, etc.: She seems better this morning. 2. to appear to one s own senses, mind, observation, judgment, etc.: It seems to me that someone is calling. 3. to appear to exist: There seems no need to go now. 4.… …   Universalium

  • seem — [sēm] vi. [ME semen, prob. < ON sœma, to conform to (akin to OE seman, to bring to agreement) < IE base * sem > SAME] 1. a) to appear to be; have the look of being [to seem happy] b) to appear; give the impression: usually followed by an …   English World dictionary

  • Seem — Seem, v. t. To befit; to beseem. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • seem — ► VERB 1) give the impression of being. 2) (cannot seem to do) appear to be unable to do, despite having tried. ORIGIN originally also in the sense «be appropriate»: from an Old Norse word meaning fitting …   English terms dictionary

  • seem|ly — «SEEM lee», adjective, li|er, li|est, adverb. –adj. 1. fitting or becoming with respect to good taste; suitable; proper: »Some old people do not consider modern dances seemly. SYNONYM(S) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Seem. — Seem., bei Pflanzennamen Abkürzung für B. Seemann (s. d.) …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

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